Personal tours or virtual tours available. Click Here.

Find the right retirement residence for you.

Blog

Featured

101 Results for Search: Dementia

For older people living with cognitive impairment and mild-to-moderate dementia, Chartwell offers a unique Memory Living Program. We sat down with Allison Schindler, Chartwell’s Director of Memory Living, to find out what makes the program special—and how it’s helping seniors and their families to enjoy a good day, every day.
A healthy human gut environment, which contains many different types of good bacteria, contributes to better overall health and longer life. Regular exercise, an active social life, and a nutritious diet rich in fibre, probiotics and prebiotics can improve and restore gut health. Better gut health can help to lift mood, sharpen your mind, and boost immunity.
Maintaining, expanding, or deepening social connections in your daily life can help to prevent or ease depression and anxiety, protect your heart, and strengthen your immune system. Studies show that strong social ties and support also boost brain health and may reduce the risk of dementia, lower the risk of physical disability, and are associated with greater longevity.
Mounting research shows that staying socially engaged can benefit older adults by keeping brains working properly, and even help to prevent dementia and Alzheimer’s.* So while getting together with friends is beneficial one its own, for a fun bonus brain boost, why not add a social component to those three healthy brain habits?
The latest research shows with aging the brain thrives and continues to make new connections through diverse social, cognitive and physical activities.
Supporting and connecting meaningfully with someone living with dementia can make a vital positive difference and help overcome isolation in normal circumstances and in pandemic situations.
It’s important to challenge a common stigma, which assumes people living with Alzheimer’s disease can’t enjoy quality of life and lose all their abilities.
Common misconceptions about Alzheimer’s disease stand in the way of understanding the disease and helping those affected.
If you have a loved one who is living with dementia, you may be exploring options to get them the support they need to live safely and with the quality of life they deserve. There are different support options available across Canada.
New brain and memory studies suggest practical ways for older adults to improve recall and help prevent memory loss. Drawing improves recall in older adults by involving multiple senses. Brisk walking and mind-body exercises such as tai chi, yoga and dancing can help improve memory in healthy older adults and people with mild cognitive impairment. Eating lots of fruits and vegetables regularly also protects against memory loss.
Active participation in the arts can have a positive impact on the health and well-being of older adults in many ways. Better physical healt ...
The Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging reports that people are living much longer. The goal of this national research project—involving m ...

Give us a call 1-855-461-0685

Or submit your questions below

Would you like to book a tour?

Sign up for our newsletter to receive retirement living and lifestyle advice *