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Enjoying certain Valentine’s Day treats in moderation confers surprising health benefits for seniors. Studies suggest that eating flavanol-rich, dark chocolate may boost heart and brain health, and lift your mood. Drinking a glass of red wine with dinner may lower diabetes and heart disease risk, while savouring chocolate-dipped strawberries can reduce inflammation.
Were you able to get together with friends and family this holiday season? For many seniors, this was the first time in a couple of years they were able to enjoy holiday gatherings—although sometimes with health precautions still in place.
Maintaining a healthy, stable weight can be challenging for older adults due to factors such as a slowing metabolism, reduced calorie needs and changes in sense of smell and taste. Eating frequent smaller meals, choosing nutrient-dense foods, and dining with others can increase the appetite of seniors trying to gain weight. Exercising regularly, shifting to healthier food choices, and reducing portion sizes can be helpful in reducing excess weight.
Vitamin D deficiency is more common in older adults, especially as the days get darker in winter. Getting enough vitamin D daily through supplements and dietary sources is important for bone health, muscle function and brain activity. Adequate daily vitamin D intake also bolsters immunity and may reduce the risks of type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, autoimmune disease, cancer, and other conditions associated with low vitamin D blood levels.
The holiday season is meant to be joyful, but it can be stressful too. Self-care is especially important for older adults to help manage disruptions in eating, exercise and sleeping schedules, and pressure to overdo social activities. By keeping physically active, practicing relaxation techniques, eating rich foods in moderation, and getting enough sleep, you can reduce stress, recharge, and stay healthy to fully enjoy your time with family and friends.
You’re not just imagining it: along with feeling drier in the winter, your skin may also be distractingly itchy too. It’s a recognized dermatological condition known as “winter itch” or “winter skin syndrome,” and according to a research study for a major skin cream brand, six in 10 Americans suffer from it.
Looking for a way to boost your walking power that’s also joint friendly, gives you an upper-body and core workout, and helps your balance too? Welcome to Nordic pole walking, a fun—and senior friendly activity—that all people, including those with arthritis, shoulder problems, and Parkinson’s, may find enjoyable and helpful in managing their health.
Have you noticed that November is the hairiest month? For the past 15 years, Canadian men have grown November moustaches in support of prostate cancer research through the Movember Foundation.
Osteoporosis affects two million Canadians and 4 out of 5 injury hospitalizations among seniors are due to falls. Improving balance through tai chi and dancing, doing regular weight-bearing and resistance exercises, and getting enough calcium, vitamin D and protein through diet and supplements can strengthen bones and help prevent falls. Checking vision and hearing regularly, wearing sensible footwear, and using appropriate mobility aids can also reduce the risk of falls.
It’s time to say a fond farewell to sipping gin and tonics on the patio and move into fall’s warm and spicy libations. Think apple cider cocktails with bourbon or an espresso martini. Pair them with prepared snacks or hors d’oeuvres, invite friends from your senior living community or neighbourhood, and you have an instant fun and easy get-together. Check out what’s popular in drink trends for the fall:
Lower back pain becomes more prevalent with aging and professional medical guidelines recommend nondrug treatments as the most effective first line of treatment. You can help prevent back pain by practicing back-healthy habits, along with daily stretching and core strengthening exercises. Studies show yoga, tai chi, physical therapy, massage, and appropriate use of cold and heat therapies may ease lower back pain, speed recovery, and improve quality life.
Feeling gratitude and expressing appreciation have a positive impact on your physical and mental health because these emotions and attitudes lower stress, foster strong social connections, and encourage a healthy lifestyle. Studies show thankfulness strengthens and heals the heart, increases empathy, and eases depression. A grateful disposition also bolsters immunity, improves sleep, and promotes healthy habits.

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