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According to Statistics Canada, the 85+ group also has unique health care and housing needs that will require a range of solutions: “An increasing number are no longer living in private dwellings and need different types of housing options, such as seniors’ residences at first, and nursing care facilities as they get older,” Statistics Canada reports.
There’s no denying that moving can be stressful for anyone, especially for seniors. Those who choose retirement living, however, can enjoy peace of mind knowing that many senior living residences provide what’s known as a “continuum of care”— setting and services that allow you or a loved one to age in place without the need for a move.
For older people living with cognitive impairment and mild-to-moderate dementia, Chartwell offers a unique Memory Living Program. We sat down with Allison Schindler, Chartwell’s Director of Memory Living, to find out what makes the program special—and how it’s helping seniors and their families to enjoy a good day, every day.
At Chartwell, we strive to source our vegetables, fruit, dairy, and meat from local farms through our suppliers. Recently, our Senior Director of Food & Beverage, John Curtis and Chartwell food purchasing specialist Patricia Page—along with Tammy and Brandon from our partner, Fresh Start—visited a farm in Ontario to hear their story and learn more about the ingredients that form the foundation of our meals.
There are numerous ways for seniors to combat boredom, including keeping mentally, physically and spiritually active, trying new things, and importantly, maintaining a social life with friends and family. But while it’s easy to identify the antidotes to boredom, how do you apply them?
Although Canadian women live longer than Canadian men, older women are more likely to develop chronic illnesses and disability. Moving to a retirement community can help women, including those whose spouses are in poor health or have passed away, reduce chronic illness risks through stimulating social and physical activities. They can also improve their health and quality of life with easy access to artistic pursuits and nutritious meals with friends.
Moving to and living in a retirement home offers older adults easy access to diverse recreational programs that provide powerful, wide-ranging therapeutic and health benefits. Moving to music boosts brain health and longevity, stretching programs improve balance and flexibility, and savouring positive moments builds emotional resilience. Volunteering strengthens social bonds and gives a sense of purpose, while pursuing artistic passions lifts your mood.
You’ll find endless articles, books, videos and blogs devoted to the art of living with less—not just in terms of material goods, but in treasuring only the people, the pursuits, and the parts of our lives that bring us happiness and freedom to live the way we want to live. But there is also another way to discover a simplified life: it comes in the form of a retirement residence, where simplicity—and freedom—are built right in.
Maintaining, expanding, or deepening social connections in your daily life can help to prevent or ease depression and anxiety, protect your heart, and strengthen your immune system. Studies show that strong social ties and support also boost brain health and may reduce the risk of dementia, lower the risk of physical disability, and are associated with greater longevity.
Retirement living is an option that addresses all of those concerns. There is a home-like environment that is safe, provides meals and housekeeping, as well as the opportunity to socialize and have friends right where you live. Easy socialization is one of the best aspects of retirement living. No one should spend their later years isolated and lonely.
It’s a common question: why would I consider retirement living unless I need nursing support or 24-hour care? While personal support is conveniently available in retirement residences, and can be customized to your specific needs—including a spectrum of light services, such as medication management, to the more substantial, like assistance with your daily routine, an escort to meals and activities, and other assisted living services—senior living communities are also designed for active, independent older adults.
Battling the winter elements can be challenging for seniors, creating barriers to social and physical activities and health risks in cold, icy conditions. Moving to a retirement community offers seniors many opportunities for social companionship to brighten daily life and beat the winter blues. Retirement living also offers easy access to stimulating recreational experiences, tasty, nutritious meals and a safe, comfortable haven from the hassles and hazards of winter.

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