Personal tours or virtual tours available. Book a Tour.

Find the right retirement residence for you.

Blog

Featured

235 Results for Search: Heart Health

People who feel and see themselves as younger than their chronological age tend to experience better health and longevity. A positive view of aging bolsters brain and heart health, builds psychological resilience and preserves hearing. A youthful outlook is also associated with lower depression and hospitalization risks, fewer aches and pains, and less frailty.
People with a sunny outlook enjoy better mental and physical health, and they are generally more resilient in coping with challenges and setbacks. Studies show that an optimistic attitude helps to protect the heart, reduces stress and anxiety, and boosts immunity. Accentuating the positive is also good for brain health, lifts mood, increases longevity and improves sleep.
Intergenerational programs that foster stronger connections between seniors and younger generations offer a wide range of cognitive, emotional, and physical health benefits for older adults. Studies show that intergenerational connections lift mood, sharpen mind and memory, and reduce social isolation. Active participation in intergenerational programs also boosts health, improves self-esteem, and helps older adults find meaning and purpose.
As we all know, nothing compares to a homemade dish made with fresh, seasonal vegetables. They make our dish taste 100 times better! Whether we’re talking about Quebec asparagus, zucchini, or roasted sun-drenched tomatoes, the tastes and flavours that they provide are simply mouthwatering!
Eating in an environmentally sustainable way is good for the health of the planet and your health too. Eating less red meat and plenty of legumes, whole grains, nuts, fruits, and other vegetables reduces green gas emissions substantially and lowers risks of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. Eating locally and seasonally, while limiting consumption of ultra-processed foods, also lowers your carbon footprint and promotes your overall health.
Taking care of plants and gardening can do wonders for your well-being. Scientific research has shown that simply being in contact with plants can improve your mental and physical health. On top of that, gardening is a great excuse to get some much-needed exercise and therefore can help you maintain a healthy weight and blood pressure.
Excerpt: Research shows that while depression, high stress, anger, and loneliness can increase the risk of heart disease, promoting and supporting psychological and emotional health is good for your heart. Thinking positively, practicing self-compassion, and recognizing and treating depression help to lower the risk of heart attack and stroke. Meditating to reduce stress, strengthening social ties, and finding purpose also protect your heart and improve quality of life.
Did you know that 45% of Canadians over the age of 20 have at least one risk factor for heart disease? These factors include stress, a sedentary lifestyle, tobacco use and a poor diet. Therefore, what kind of food should we eat to help prevent heart conditions?
A balanced diet of nutrient-dense, whole foods nourishes and supports the mental, emotional, and physical health of older adults. The latest research shows that foods rich in vitamin K protect the heart, eating plenty of fruits helps prevent diabetes, and fermented foods are gut friendly. A Mediterranean-style diet improves mood, nuts and berries boost brain health, and anti-inflammatory foods lower cortisol and reduce stress.
Maintaining, expanding, or deepening social connections in your daily life can help to prevent or ease depression and anxiety, protect your heart, and strengthen your immune system. Studies show that strong social ties and support also boost brain health and may reduce the risk of dementia, lower the risk of physical disability, and are associated with greater longevity.
Dancing your way through the pandemic is a healthy antidote to cabin fever that can improve your physical, mental, and emotional well-being.
Monitoring and controlling your blood pressure is especially important to safeguard your health during the pandemic because changes in activity, diet or stress could raise blood pressure levels without you knowing.

Give us a call 1-855-461-0685

Or submit your questions below

Would you like to book a tour?

Sign up for our newsletter to receive retirement living and lifestyle advice *