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366 Results for Search: Aging Research

Regular physical activity helps to prevent chronic disease and promote brain health in older adults in multiple ways. Studies show that moderate-intensity aerobic exercise boosts episodic and short-memory, lifts mood, sharpens thinking, and improves decision-making. Engaging in various kinds of physical activity, including yoga and tai chi, also helps to ease stress and anxiety, increase deep sleep and sleep duration, and relieve chronic pain.
People who feel and see themselves as younger than their chronological age tend to experience better health and longevity. A positive view of aging bolsters brain and heart health, builds psychological resilience and preserves hearing. A youthful outlook is also associated with lower depression and hospitalization risks, fewer aches and pains, and less frailty.
Older adults who do volunteer work to help others, such as mentoring children in need, aiding refugees or addressing climate change enjoy better health and find meaning and purpose in daily life. Doing good through formal or informal volunteering lifts mood, protects the heart, preserves memory, and reduces dementia risk. Volunteering also helps to ease stress, anxiety, and chronic pain, reduce disability risk, and add years to life.
You’re never too old to become a plant parent – no green thumb required, and the health and happiness benefits are many and varied. Check out these plants with purpose, each one offering a specific benefit while also being easy to grow and maintain.
If you‘ve fallen into believing your individual efforts to go green won’t make a difference, think about your grand- and great-grandchildren, and the kind of world they will inherit. Also consider that there are over seven million people over 65 in Canada today*; if every senior were to implement even one of the following eco-friendly suggestions, think of the difference it would make!
People with a sunny outlook enjoy better mental and physical health, and they are generally more resilient in coping with challenges and setbacks. Studies show that an optimistic attitude helps to protect the heart, reduces stress and anxiety, and boosts immunity. Accentuating the positive is also good for brain health, lifts mood, increases longevity and improves sleep.
Health Canada advises older adults get at least 2.5 hours of moderate-to-vigorous aerobic activity each week, in sessions of at least 10 minutes at a time. They also recommend adding bone and muscle-strengthening exercise twice a week,* especially useful for balance and preventing falls.
According to Statistics Canada, the 85+ group also has unique health care and housing needs that will require a range of solutions: “An increasing number are no longer living in private dwellings and need different types of housing options, such as seniors’ residences at first, and nursing care facilities as they get older,” Statistics Canada reports.
Headaches affect about half of adults globally and preventive non-drug strategies can be effective in helping to relieve headache pain and improve quality of life. Low-impact exercise, meditation, and other relaxation techniques can prevent or ease headaches by reducing stress and unwinding tight muscles. Getting enough sleep, eating healthy meals, staying hydrated, and avoiding headache triggers can also help to prevent or reduce the frequency and intensity of headaches.
A healthy human gut environment, which contains many different types of good bacteria, contributes to better overall health and longer life. Regular exercise, an active social life, and a nutritious diet rich in fibre, probiotics and prebiotics can improve and restore gut health. Better gut health can help to lift mood, sharpen your mind, and boost immunity.
You heard it here first: white and grey hair is trending, and many women are proudly going silver. But why do we even go grey? Will grey hair make you look older? How do you take care of it properly? Luc Vincent, an expert hairstylist, gives us all the details about white hair and how to care for it.
Older adults need to be proactive in addressing pandemic-associated risks that can make early detection and control of type 2 diabetes more challenging. New knowledge about lifestyle measures to prevent, reverse and manage diabetes, and setting age-appropriate blood sugar control targets, can lead to better health outcomes. New tools such as smart phone apps and flash glucose monitoring can also support better blood sugar and diabetes management.

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